Environmental Problems of the Greeks and Romans: Ecology in the Ancient Mediterranean (Ancient Society and History) (Paperback)

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Description


How did ancient societies change the environment and how do their actions continue to affect us today?

In this dramatically revised and expanded second edition of the work entitled Pan's Travail, J. Donald Hughes examines the environmental history of the classical period and argues that the decline of ancient civilizations resulted in part from their exploitation of the natural world. Focusing on Greece and Rome, as well as areas subject to their influences, Hughes offers a detailed look at the impact of humans and their technologies on the ecology of the Mediterranean basin.

Evidence of deforestation in ancient Greece, the remains of Roman aqueducts and mines, and paintings on centuries-old pottery that depict agricultural activities document ancient actions that resulted in detrimental consequences to the environment. Hughes compares the ancient world's environmental problems to other persistent social problems and discusses attitudes toward nature expressed in Greek and Latin literature.

In addition to extensive revisions based on the latest research, this new edition includes photographs from Hughes's worldwide excursions, a new chapter on warfare and the environment, and an updated bibliography.

About the Author


J. Donald Hughes is John Evans Distinguished Professor and a professor emeritus of history at the University of Denver. His books include The Mediterranean: An Environmental History, An Environmental History of the World: Humankind's Changing Role in the Community of Life, and What is Environmental History?
Product Details
ISBN: 9781421412115
ISBN-10: 142141211X
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication Date: February 15th, 2014
Pages: 320
Language: English
Series: Ancient Society and History